Sort debris into five categories and place within five feet of a roadway

Residents are reminded to stack and pile debris for pickup within five feet of roadway

The Corps of Engineers is continuing to coordinate the collection of hurricane debris. Donalsonville City Manger Steve Hicks received notification that the first pass through the City of Donalsonville was complete and a second pickup pass is now underway in the city. The first pass out side of the city of Donalsonville and throughout Seminole County, however, is not complete, and according to Corps representatives, “we are still several weeks from finishing first pass in the non municipality areas.”

Residents are requested to stack, pile and sort debris into FIVE categories: vegetative debris, construction and demolition debris, appliances and white goods, electronics, household hazardous waste. Normal household debris will not be picked up as part of this removal program. You should continue to follow your normal garbage disposal schedule.

Debris piles should be placed within five feet of roadway. Any debris placed from the sidewalk, ditch or utility line toward your property will not be picked up. If you don’t have a sidewalk, ditch or utility line place debris at the edge of your property before the curb or edge of the roadway.

The mountains of debris continue to grow at Seminole County’s three collection sites, east of the airport and two sites off Highway 253 near Lake Seminole where eventually all debris will be ground into chips for permanent disposal.

The Corps reminds motorists to remain vigilant in sharing the roads with these debris removal crews – which are out working from dawn to dusk. Be prepared to slow down,  stop and consider the roadway as a one way road when you see the flagmen, lights and signs. Crews are out from dawn until dusk.

As of presstime on Wednesday, December 5, Mark Rankin, Public Affairs Specialist for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District reported, that since debris pick up began in October, 617,717 cubic yards of debris have been picked up in Seminole County alone. Decatur County’s collection total is 439,182 cubic yards of debris and Miller County’s is 159,317 cubic yards. Mountains of debris are growing at Seminole County’s three collection sites, east of the airport and two sites off Highway 253 near Lake Seminole where eventually all debris will be ground into chips for permanent disposal.

 

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